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Archive for the ‘Common Behavioral Issues’ Category

So, as it turns out, Mr. Darcy is mildly afraid of both the clicker AND the target stick. This makes sense because although he is a very friendly pudd, he is very “head shy”. About the only part of the process he is a fan of is the turkey I’ve been using as the reward. I’m going to put the clicker inside of a sock to muffle the sound, and rub the target stick end in some tuna juice, and give it another go :).

I’ve also been trying clicking with a couple lucky catof the Bideawee Adoption Center cats- a very confident, but slightly naughty, 6 year old female, and a charming, food hound, 10 year old male, neither of whom are “head shy” or sensitive to noise. Even with the near constant interruptions and the muffled sounds of the dogs barking in the next room, they’ve made good progress. They have become bored with the commercial treats, though, so I think that I will have to invest in some turkey breast for them too!

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Vet Prep

tuxedo junction

 

I can’t emphasize enough how important it is that your cat not view has carrier as a scary, strange smelling thing that takes him to scary, strange places. Pull the carrier out from time to time, throw some catnip and some treats into it. and repeat for a few days at a time. If you do this once a month or so, perhaps even working up to serving a tasty meal or two in it, the next time you actually have to take him to the vet, things should start off much more peacefully!

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So…it’s been a while ;). Going to give this whole blogging thing another go!

Phil is our 9 year old feral/semi-feral boy. He is funny and quirky, only allowing us to touch him when we’re in bed at night, and then he can’t get enough. Clipping his nails used to be possible only by hunting him down, cornering him, and then hanging on tight while getting as many clipped as possible before he freed himself. Not a series of events that a cat behavior consultant could feel proud of, but a necessity none the less. For the last two years, however, even that has become impossible. With our sweet Juno gone, and with the addition of Mak, our lovable,

Phil

Phil

but hardly top cat material, senior boy, Phil finds himself vying for the highest rung of the hierarchy around Chez Sleuth. Basically, no one has the desire or skill set to be in charge, and since Philsy  has the ability to “go all feral” on the other two, he’s gotten a bit more confident, and this extends, sadly, to refusing to allow me to hang on to him for more than a scary second or two.

Here’s the problem. If an indoor cat’s nails NEVER get trimmed, they will eventually curl around and grow into their pads. My options are to bring him to the vet, wish them luck, hope they succeed, and repeat a few times every year, or to find something he will enjoy scratching that might wear down or even break off some of the tips. I’ve just brought in a nice, nubby welcome mat because he tends to like to lie by the door, and has shown a preference for that kind of scratching surface. I’ll keep you posted!

 

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http://www.apartmenttherapy.com/la/pets-dogs-cats-snakes-etc/best-tips-for-traveling-with-pets-089546

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It is official! Cats ARE brilliant.

BBC NEWS | Science & Environment | Cats ‘exploit’ humans by purring

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Reading my last post, I realized that perhaps I should find a thorough definition of what constitutes a feral cat. Contrary to popular belief, feral cats are no different biologically than your chubby , lazy house cat. I thought it best to link all of you to an excellent article from The Cat Site. Happy learning!

http://www.thecatsite.com/Snips/194/Feral-Cats-The-Invisible-Felines.html

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